GDC

CONFERENCE  

|    Design
    DESIGN

Creating compelling, immersive games requires understanding, visualizing, demonstrating, and tuning the interactions of an ever-increasing number of game tools and systems. While game designers need to understand the possibilities of new technologies, the Design Track reminds developers that they must also continue to master the traditional disciplines of drama, game play, and psychology.

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HIGHLIGHTED SESSIONS

Reviewing the Game Development Process with Another Perspective from X-GAME to its Platinum Edition Super Vision: State War
Luo Ming (Tencent)
In most cases, we use a very rational perspective when looking at the game development process. In this session, we will trace back to some representative events which happened to our team in the game development from a emotional point of view, then profoundly reveal the experience and lessons we gained and learned in the development of X-GAME and its platinum edition Super Vision: State War in terms of four aspects: "direction", "concept", "principle" and "balance", as well as the choices we made, feedback we received and results we obtained in these four aspects which we consider the most important in the game development. The session will also cover the impact of these factors on the game development process and their guiding roles in future products development.
We Are Not Heroes: Contextualizing Violence through Narrative
Walt Williams (2K Games)
2K Games released the genre-bending, military shooter Spec Ops: The Line, receiving critical acclaim for its provocative and mature narrative. Join lead writer/narrative designer Walt Williams as he discusses the work and theory that went into crafting the game's story. Expounding on his original talk from the 2013 Narrative Summit, Walt will explore how narrative defines morality and how it can be used to mature the medium beyond the confines of violent gameplay.
Designing Mark of the Ninja
Nels Anderson (Klei Entertainment)
Ossified genre conventions are a major challenge to advancing game design as a craft. It is seductive to comfortably settle on familiar devices, but this can hamstring the ability to explore and express new ideas with games. Innovation within a genre isn't easy, but it is important. Mark of the Ninja adapted stealth gameplay to side-scrolling 2D, but the means to do this were often counterintuitive. Rather than emulating genre tropes, Mark of the Ninja was derived from understanding the true appeal of stealth games (player-centric design allowing for gameplay choice), and used these principles to adapt stealth games to a new perspective. Lead designer Nels Anderson will discuss the process that was used to design Mark of the Ninja, and how it can be applied to innovate within established genres.
Psychology vs. Structure: The Power of Numbers in Game Design
Dave Mark (Intrinsic Algorithm LLC)
Numbers, visible or not, are often at the core of game design. They are the expression of the designer's vision of "how the world works." There are considerations that go beyond simply balancing an equation, however. Through the selection of numbers such as scores, abilities, damage ranges, and even prices, we are often crafting what a player perceives, believes, and even feels. Through extensive use of (often amusing) examples, this lecture will demonstrate what our numbers may be conveying and explore ways that we can leverage the psychology of numbers to build more engaging games.

 

ALL DESIGN SESSIONS

Designing In-Game Purchases
Ethan Levy (Quarter Spiral)
   
Designing Mark of the Ninja
Nels Anderson (Klei Entertainment)
   
How Hard Could It Be? The Story of a Cinematic
Brian Kindregan (Blizzard Entertainment)
   
Psychology vs. Structure: The Power of Numbers in Game Design
Dave Mark (Intrinsic Algorithm LLC)
   
Rethinking How We Build Games and Why: The Papo & Yo Story
Vander Caballero (Minority Media)
   
Reviewing the Game Development Process with Another Perspective from X-GAME to its Platinum Edition Super Vision: State War
Luo Ming (Tencent)
   
We Are Not Heroes: Contextualizing Violence through Narrative
Walt Williams (2K Games)
   

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